Monday, October 28, 2024 - Members of the Legislative Assembly (MLAs).

Electoral district 

Advanced voting dates and times are currently TBD, and will be posted to the Elections Saskatchewan website when available. 

Find your voting location here. 


TAKE NOTE:

You can register or modify your registration on the permanent list of electors:

- Online

- By mail or email by sending this form to [email protected] or #301-3303 Hillsdale Street Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada S4S 6W9

- In person at a polling location during advance voting or on election day

- By phone at 1-877-958-8683 (Monday to Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. CST)

 

The Basics

Am I eligible to vote?

To be eligible to vote in Saskatchewan, you must: 

  • Be a Canadian citizen,
  • Be at least 18 years old on the last day of voting, 
  • Be a Saskatchewan resident for at least the last 6 months, and
  • Ordinarily reside at the current address of residence.

However, there are certain persons who are exempted from meeting all of these criteria. Exceptions exist for:

Students

Students who have moved from outside the province to study in Saskatchewan are immediately eligible to vote in provincial elections, provided they are Canadian citizens and at least 18 years of age. They are not required to have resided in the province for six months.

Students who have been living in Saskatchewan, but have moved to attend a school away from where they have been living, are permitted to register either at the:

  • Residential address from which they moved; or at the
  • Address of the location where they currently live while studying.

However, each student can only be registered at one address of residence — it is their own personal choice as to which address that should be.

Canadian military personnel 

Any members of the regular, special, or reserve force of the Canadian Forces, who leaves another province or territory to serve in Saskatchewan, immediately becomes eligible to register and vote in provincial elections, provided they are Canadian citizens and at least 18 years of age. They are not required to have resided in the province for six months.

Members of the Canadian Forces who are required to leave their residence in Saskatchewan to serve outside the province are permitted to remain registered as a provincial voter at the address where they resided before moving.

If a Canadian Forces member residing in one location in Saskatchewan is required to relocate and serve within the Forces at another location in the province, they may decide which location they wish to be registered at for the purposes of voting.  However, each member of the Forces may only be registered as a provincial voter at one address of residence.

In each of the three cases above, if a spouse or the dependents of a Forces member moves with that member, they are legally provided the same voter registration flexibility that applies to the Forces member.

British Subjects who resided in the province at a specific period of time

A non-Canadian, who is a British Subject and who was qualified as a Saskatchewan provincial voter on June 23, 1971 (that is, they were born on or before June 23, 1953 and resided in the province since or before December 23, 1970) is permitted to register as a provincial voter.  However, they must declare their non-Canadian British Subject status at the time of registration.

A British Subject is defined as a person who is a citizen of any other Commonwealth country.  There are 56 member states in the Commonwealth of Nations.

Election candidates 

A candidate for a provincial election, or the spouse or dependents of that candidate, can choose to be registered:

  • At the address in which ordinarily live, or
  • In any polling division in the constituency in which the candidate is contesting the election.

Taking the option of registering in a particular polling division within a constituency in which the candidate is running can only be exercised once the candidate’s nomination papers have been accepted by the Returning Officer. This does not happen until Nomination Day, which is a full ten days after the election period officially starts.

Where and when can I vote?

Advance voting

Advance voting dates and times are currently TBD, and will be posted to the Elections Saskatchewan website when available. 


On election day

Election Day for the 2024 Provincial General Election is scheduled for October 28, 2024. Find your constituency here. Registered voters will recieve a voter information card in the mail, or by text/email if they choose, which will tell you where and when to vote.


By mail/absentee voting

To vote by mail, you must complete this application and submit it to be received by the Chief Electoral Officer no later than 11 days before election day. You must include a copy of your ID in order for your application to be processed. 

You can either: send it to your constituency’s Returning Officer, whose contact information can be found here; or if you are applying before the writ has dropped, email to [email protected] or mail to Elections Saskatchewan, #301-3303 Hillsdale Street, Regina, SK S4S 6W9. 

Once your application has been processed and the writ has dropped, you will receive your Vote by Mail kit in the mail, which you will complete and return to Elections Saskatchewan using the postage paid envelope included in the kit. 


Homebound voting

If you are unable to leave home to vote both at an advance poll and on election day due to illness or disability, you can vote via homebound voting. This means that election officials will come to your home to provide you with a ballot and the opportunity to cast your ballot. 

To vote via homebound voting, you need to complete this application and submit it to be received by the Returning Officer in your constituency at least 8 days before election day. The contact information of all Returning Officers can be found here

Once your application is approved, you will be contacted to arrange a date/time for election officials to come to your home. Homebound voting takes place on the same days as advance polling days.

You are not required to provide copies of your ID when you apply, but you will need to provide ID when officials arrive at your home.


The caregiver of a homebound voter is eligible to vote in this manner if they live in the same constituency as the homebound voter. 


Mobile polls 

The Election Act (1996) provides for mobile polls to be taken to a care facility where the returning officer determines that there are special or unusual circumstances, subject to the approval of the Chief Electoral Officer. 

Hospital and remand centre polls 

Elections SK establishes polls at hospitals and remand centres across the province.

Do I need to register to vote?

Yes! You do need to register in order to vote, however, you do not need to register in advance, meaning, you can register at the polling station on election day. 

Registering at the polls might mean spending a little more time waiting in line, so we recommend registering to vote online in advance.

To avoid waiting in longer Election Day lines, register to vote beforehand!

Do I need to bring ID to vote?

Yes!

You are required to prove your identity AND physical address. There are many types of identification that can be accepted at the polling stations from your Saskatchewan Driver’s License to your Health Card and a utility bill.

Be sure to double check what kinds of IDs are accepted before you vote!

If you do not have sufficient ID (make sure to check the above list first as there are many acceptable ID options), you can have a registered voter in your constituency vouch for you. If this is the case, you will have to swear an oath, and the person vouching for you must be an eligible voter who has valid authorized identification. This person can only vouch for one person.

If you are voting by mail, the address on your ID must match the address you have listed on the application as your ordinary residential address. 

Can I work for Elections Saskatchewan?

Yes! 

You can complete this form to be notified when Elections SK starts hiring for the 2024 Provincial Election. 

There are also permanent positions currently available for Returning Officers and Election Clerks - find more information here

What if...

I’m working on Election Day?

Voters are entitled to three consecutive hours free from work to vote during advance voting or on election day.

If your work schedule can’t accommodate you to take four consecutive hours off, your employer must provide extra time off. 

This doesn’t mean you get to just take off from work for three hours though. It just means you have to be given a window of three hours to vote at some point during the day. So if you work from 12:30 PM to 8:30 PM, you still have three hours before your shift begins to vote (9 AM to 12 PM).

Your boss can't dock your pay or penalize you for taking the time to vote. You have to be paid your regular wage for the hours you're not working while you vote. Have that conversation with your employer now, as they have the right to decide when you get your time off!

I can’t make it to a polling station on Election Day?

If you already know you're going to be busy, unable to physically reach the polls, or away on vacation (lucky you) on Election Day, make a plan to vote early!

You have four options: 

1: Vote by mail! Your application to vote by mail must be received by the Chief Electoral Officer no later than 11 days before election day.

2: Vote at an advanced poll! Advance voting dates and times are currently TBD, and will be posted to the Elections Saskatchewan website when available. 

3: Homebound voting! Your application must be received by your constituency’s Returning Officer no later than 8 days before election day. Homebound voting takes place on the same days as advance polling days.

4: Mobile polls & hospital and remand centre polls! Elections SK establishes polls at hospitals, remand centres, and some care facilities across the province. 

I’m a student living away from home?

Students who have moved from outside the province to study in Saskatchewan are immediately eligible to vote in provincial elections, provided they are Canadian citizens and at least 18 years of age. They are not required to have resided in the province for six months.

Students who have been living in Saskatchewan, but have moved to attend a school away from where they have been living, are permitted to register either at the:

  • Residential address from which they moved; or at the
  • Address of the location where they currently live while studying.

However, each student can only be registered at one address of residence — it is their own personal choice as to which address that should be.

I live in a remote or isolated area?

Vote by mail! Your application must be received by the Chief Electoral Officer no later than 11 days before election day. 

I’m living in an Indigenous community or reserve?

You can choose to vote by mail, or find your nearest polling station. Voting places are being confirmed and will be published on the Elections Saskatchewan website when available. 

I’m living abroad?

To be eligible to vote in Saskatchewan, you must be a resident of the province for at least the last 6 months leading up to election day. However, certain people are exempt from this criteria: 

Members of the Canadian Forces who are required to leave their residence in Saskatchewan to serve outside the province are permitted to remain registered as a provincial voter at the address where they resided before moving. If a spouse or the dependents of a Forces member moves with that member, they are legally provided the same voter registration flexibility that applies to the Forces member.

A non-Canadian, who is a British Subject and who was qualified as a Saskatchewan provincial voter on June 23, 1971 (that is, they were born on or before June 23, 1953 and resided in the province since or before December 23, 1970) is permitted to register as a provincial voter. However, they must declare their non-Canadian British Subject status at the time of registration.

I recently moved?

You can vote in your new electoral district! Just bring a piece of ID and a proof of your new address. 

To make things quicker at the polls, though, you can register your new address before Election Day.

I’m currently without a home?

To register to vote, you can use the address of a shelter, hostel, or similar support centre that provides food, lodging, or other social services. 

As proof of address, you can use an admission form to a shelter or a letter of stay confirming you are receiving a shelter’s services. If you aren’t able to provide either of these documents, an eligible voter, who knows you and lives in the same constituency as you, may vouch for you at the voting place when you arrive to vote in-person. 

I'm not old enough to vote yet?

The Chief Electoral Officer sends a birthday card to all Saskatchewan residents for the 18th birthday to remind them that they are now eligible to vote - you can register to vote as soon as you turn 18.

 

Accessibility

Is this information accessible in other formats?

A Voter Information Card will be sent to each voter on the Preliminary Voters List before election day. In addition to other information, such as date and time of the election, the VIC will inform voters of the accessibility of advance poll locations.

 

The Voters Guide and voter education materials for the 2024 provincial election will be available in a range of languages and formats, including electronic, audio, and larger text format. Materials will be posted here when available. 

 

The Elections SK website has been designed to meet current Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) and contains the following accessibility features:

  • Compatibility with screen readers;
  • Colours that contrast each other (luminosity contrast ratio); and
  • Plain language to make it reader friendly.

 

Teletype (TTY) Services enable people with hearing loss to access information by telephone. TTY is available at Elections SK head office during business hours. TTY will also be available through Elections SK’s public call centre during enumeration and the election period.

Are polling places accessible?

Polling places are assessed against the following accessibility criteria: 

  • Allocated parking spaces, where available, close to entry for voters with disabilities;
  • Level access to the building;
  • Appropriate signage;
  • Doors and passageways comply with current width, clearance and threshold requirements; and
  • Adequate lighting.

In instances where a polling place is not accessible, action will be taken if possible to make the location more accessible, such as adding ramps and mats to door entrances.


If a polling place cannot be made accessible, Elections SK will assign additional information officers to provide the necessary assistance to people with disabilities at the front entrance to a building. This will ensure that opportunities such as curbside voting are immediately identified and provided to voters requiring this option.


An information officer will be at all polling places to provide directions and assistance to voters, including disabled voters, immediately when they arrive. These individuals will receive sensitivity training as they will be the first point of contact for voters at polling places.

Polling day officials will be provided with a supply of temporary disabled parking signs to be used as required at polling places.

A supply of temporary lamps will be included in polling place supplies and available in the event that the lighting in any polling station needs to be enhanced. 


Election workers receive training on how to facilitate voting for persons with disabilities. Disability sensitivity training for all election officials is provided through a training video. This ensures instructions are consistently delivered. Manuals for poll officials include instructions on how to assist voters with disabilities and emphasize the role of poll workers in supporting people with disabilities at the polling place, if required. A video is also available for use by the public, in both American Sign Language (ASL) and Described Video

 

Deputy returning officers are permitted to assist a voter in marking their ballot either inside or outside the voting station. They must mark the ballot paper in the manner directed by the voter in the presence of the poll clerk and of the candidate’s representatives in the polling place, and remove and destroy the counterfoil.

  • The deputy returning officer, the voter, or the voter’s accompanying friend can also assist to deposit the ballot in the ballot box.
  • An individual may act as the friend to assist at the polls for two voters.

The Election Act, 1996 provides for sign language interpreters to assist voters at polling places. 


Elections SK will notify municipal transit systems offering paratransit services of the days when voting will be taking place. Advance notice will allow individuals requiring transportation to make the appropriate arrangements and the transit authorities to make any adjustments in order to meet the increased demand.


Additional directional signage will be available at all voting locations. Contrast is one of the most critical factors in enhancing visual functioning, with yellow on a dark background being easier to read.

All polling stations will have the following supplies available on request:

  • Pencil grips
  • Paper and clipboards
  • Magnifiers
  • Braille ballot template



Election Reading / Resources

May is Voter Registration Month!
The month of May marks a special time dedicated to ensuring you are prepared to take part in this upcoming election: it's Voter Registration Month!

During Voter Registration Month, we encourage everyone, particularly first time voters, to check, update and add your information to the voters list.

Eligible voters can register to vote now online, by mail or by phone. To get started, stop by the Elections Saskatchewan Voter Registration Page.