VOLUME 89 | WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2022

MAKING DEMOCRACY DIGESTIBLE. ONE BITE AT A TIME.



Welcome to The Feed, your bi-weekly resource to Canadian politics and policies broken down into itty bitty (super witty) bite-sized knowledge by Apathy is Boring.
Pun intended.

Follow The Feed on Instagram to get a little more #cdnpoli on the side.

It was Giving Tuesday yesterday - and Apathy is Boring strongly believes there are more ways to give than just financially: your time, talent, and treasure are all valuable components to help us continue running our programs and impacting democracy. 

We encourage you to spend time applying to our RISE or BUILD programs or sharing it with your networks. If you have a talent to share, we encourage you to connect with us to volunteer for our voter engagement activations across Canada. 

Finally, if you have some treasure, we encourage you to donate to our programs. With your support, we can continue to produce the FEED, and make democracy digestible for thousands of youth across Canada.

WHAT'S THE SCOOP?

For the first time in 36 years, Team Canada played in the FIFA World Cup, aka the world’s biggest sporting event. The men may have lost their first match 1-0 to Belgium, but for many watching it was a heartening loss, given Canada ranked 39 spots lower. Canada lost its next game 4-1 to Croatia, but that game featured our country’s first-ever goal scored at the World Cup, a Canadian heritage moment via Alphonso Davies. Soccer aside, ongoing controversies are defining the tournament in Qatar, including horrific worker conditions and the emirate’s anti-LGBTQ policies. Other issues include a last-minute beer ban and not enough hotels. Canada’s International Development Minister Harjit Sajjan visited Qatar and faced opposition criticism for not speaking out about human rights, and Amnesty International has criticized Canada Soccer for its “deafening silence.”

Talk about a triple whammy. The pandemic, RSV and flu season are hitting hard this year, affecting a health care system already under strain after nearly three years of COVID-19. Across the country, there’s staffing shortages, burnout, overrun emergency rooms and long wait times for surgeries. So, what can be done amid this so-called tripledemic? Health Minister Jean-Yves Duclos is calling for COVID and flu shots for kids, while associations representing doctors, nurses and other health providers are calling on federal and provincial governments to do more, including allowing doctors to work anywhere in the country and strengthening mental health supports for workers. Head here to hear a Toronto emergency physician’s thoughts on how to fix health care. 

After late-night negotiations, the recent COP27 climate summit ended with countries adopting a final agreement that sets up a fund to help poor countries hurt by climate disasters. But many people still left disappointed, as the agreement doesn’t increase efforts to tackle the emissions causing climate disasters, plus decisions on who should pay into the fund weren’t made. And in other big climate news, Environment and Climate Change Canada recently unveiled Canada’s first climate adaptation strategy. The feds also committed $1.6 billion over five years to build resilience to climate change. Tell me more. The strategy is a high-level document that envisions how Canada will deal with the worst impacts of climate change. There’s multiple targets inside but not any hard numbers, which the gov says is because more detailed implementation plans will come. Stay tuned.  


NEWS NUGGETS

Ripe Old Age: The prime minister’s official residence, 24 Sussex Drive, is being closed due to health and safety hazards, the crown corporation that oversees the building announced. (Given the building’s condition, Trudeau and his family have never lived there.) The National Capital Commission is now relocating property staff and removing equipment that poses safety concerns, while it’s up to the gov to decide what to ultimately do with the property.

Ongoing Saga: To an update on a story we’ve been following for awhile: the class-action lawsuit over the chronic underfunding of the on-reserve child welfare system. What’s the latest? The federal gov and the Assembly of First Nations have both filed judicial reviews of the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal’s decision to reject Ottawa’s $20-billion settlement agreement. Why’s that? The gov says it wants clarity on how to address the parts of the deal the tribunal rejected.  

Friends Off: Canada and China relations are particularly low these days. At the recent G20 summit in Indonesia, Chinese President Xi Jinping accused Trudeau of behaving inappropriately, by leaking the contents of a discussion the two leaders had to the media. The incident comes amid multiple allegations of Chinese meddling in Canada. For more on what’s going on and how Parliament is responding, this pod’s got you covered.  

Hold My Beer: Canada’s beer sector is upset over an upcoming tax hike, which industry voice Beer Canada says will increase beer taxes by 6.3 per cent next April. An annual inflation-indexed alcohol tax was introduced in 2017. That hike comes amid other cost increases for the sector, from the price for barley to increased transportation costs. Drowning your sorrows is about to get pricier. 


WHAT ELSE WE'RE NIBBLING ON

A familiar face is back in the top job at the Green Party of Canada. Elizabeth May won the party’s recent leadership race. She will co-lead with Jonathan Pedneault, who has worked as a journalist and activist. May says the duo will bring experience and youth to the leadership role — she’s 68, he’s 32. And PM Trudeau took the stand last week at the Emergencies Act Inquiry, a highly-anticipated appearance that also marks the end of six weeks of live testimony. Catch up on what happened with five key takeaways from the PM’s testimony. Plus, any guesses on how much the entire inquiry will cost? The Privy Council Office has an estimate, and it’s nearly $19 million.


Share Your Feed-back!
Fill out this survey to tell us what you think of The Feed.


Got a question? Want to collaborate? Have any feedback?
Get in touch at [email protected].

Created with NationBuilder, software for leaders.

SUBSCRIBE TO THE FEED AND HAVE IT DELIVERED TO YOU.

TEXT #FEEDME TO 514-600-3499 TO RECEIVE TEXT ALERTS.
OR LEAVE YOUR EMAIL ADDRESS TO RECEIVE IT IN YOUR INBOX.

  • Join us in activating communities across Canada!

    Get monthly updates on our projects, programs and events.